Pilgrimpace's Blog


looking ahead
January 2, 2019, 3:15 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

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A picture from yesterday’s new year’s walk – a diamond of sunlight on the plain.

I’m not sure what to do with this blog at the moment.  I don’t want to finish it, but I think I could do with a break.

I’ll post occasional updates and things I find interesting, and then reflect on starting again later in the year.

Thank you for travelling with me.

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December 31, 2018, 10:32 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

happy new year

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December 24, 2018, 10:58 am
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christmas, tiredness, pressure, social media
December 18, 2018, 4:17 pm
Filed under: christmas, estate churches, estate ministry, necn, Uncategorized | Tags: , , ,

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I am Chair of the National Estate Churches Network.  NECN is committed to flourishing estate churches, and as part of this flourishing we want our estate churches to be bigger and have more people.

But we know that many of our churches are small and that growing them is often hard, slow work.

This is one of the times of year that church leaders and clergy are really tired.

We are also now solidly in the season of social media where colleagues are sharing their successful Christmas services.

How does this all feel?
What does faithfulness and success look like for estate churches?
How do we judge if we are doing it?
Should we all take a social media break for a fortnight?

A load of slightly random thoughts, but would value your take.

Prayers for you all in the business end of Advent

Andy



The Built Environment, Churches, Transformation, Spirituality

NECN had this enquiry:

 “I’m interested in how the church can facilitate the transformation of the built environment. I’m interested in the psychological effect of social housing on inhabitants and how good design can facilitate the presence of God in a community.

I’ve done a little reading in this area but I was wondering whether you might be able to direct me to any persons, resources, or organisations that you know of who work in this area or are exploring these issues.”

 There have been a good number of comments in different places.  This post is to gather them together.  Please add to this and keep the conversation going in the comments below.

 

Gosh … Thamesmead. Yes.
Heard a fascinating R4 programme in the summer which describes Thamesmead South (where I am) as being built by architects according to atheist principles … ie if you meet purely physical needs, you have met all human needs.
Issues like beauty / social spaces / spiritual inspiration were ignored.
The built environment therefore directly militates against everything a church aims for.
Still working out a cohesive approach … other than picking up the spiritual bits which the environment causes.

 

Headspace – the psychology of city living” by Dr.Paul Keedwell is a helpful read. It deals with aspects of the built environment and how it impacts…

 

Tim Gorringe The Built Environment

 

David Walker: “Reading my book, God’s Belongers may be a start. I’m also part of the NHF Great Places Commission and we’ve seen churches in real anchor roles.”

 

Anne Power Estates on the Edge

 

“It is also worth following current housing discussions following government releasing cap on council borrowing for new building and following Grenfell wish to avoid some of the errors of the past. How the church can influence these discussions nationally is a challenge as it has not been a major player since days of Faith in the City. However in many local areas housing associations were begunChristians, and still have significant involvement. See recent tributes to Michael Eastman or Richard Farnell.”

 

Les Crossland: Principalities, Powers and Social Structures

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7UDiSlsmmA8QWJIWWdORFhsVGM/view?fbclid=IwAR2yruWxwqtqsdh-Zv85ylc8ujB_WyQX5CpCkm7F3rNpskphUy_oU2ngUW0

 

Foxes have holes. Christian reflections on Britain’s housing needs” ed Andrew Francis available through Ekklesia.

 

“I would suggest looking at work by Stephen Hill and also the latest publication by CSAN (Catholic Social Action Network) called ‘Abide in Me’ http://www.csan.org.uk/…/2018/11/Abide-in-Me-CSAN.pdf. Suggests more Catholic parishes should be exploring this area…”

 

“I wonder if the communities that engaged with the Grenfell Tower fire 18 months ago have reflections to share.”

 

“My tuppenny worth is that the key to an environment in which people can thrive, even a not very beautiful (to some eyes) brutalist one, is some sense of collective ownership, neighbourliness, love and attention. Even so called “sink” estates can be great places to live when there is a sense of community safety, good regular maintenance and upkeep, some green planting and well used children’s areas. These things can be helped by design but don’t depend on it. Look at privately run tower blocks like those of the Barbican. The only difference between them and a council run Tower block is a concierge type service and good maintenance. A small but committed Christian presence in a community can be the catalyst for this kind of regeneration.”

 

“A very practical one is the offer of non commercial meeting / conversation space – in areas of vast “urban sprawl” with no high street etc they are one of the few “public” spaces”

 

“Minimising sensory hell and adding some ownership.”



churches and the built environment
December 1, 2018, 1:33 pm
Filed under: estate churches, Uncategorized | Tags: ,

I’ve had the following enquiry – can anyone suggest anything?

“I’m interested in how the church can facilitate the transformation of the built environment. I’m interested in the psychological effect of social housing on inhabitants and how good design can facilitate the presence of God in a community.

I’ve done a little reading in this area but I was wondering whether you might be able to direct me to any persons, resources, or organisations that you know of who work in this area or are exploring these issues.”



11
November 11, 2018, 11:23 am
Filed under: Uncategorized